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IT'S PHOTO FRIDAY!

Who remembers the old Hotel Chesapeake and Restaurant? Share your memories with us below in the comments!

Do you have a photo to share for an upcoming PHOTO FRIDAY? Email us at photos@harfordhistory.org!
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ITS PHOTO FRIDAY!Who remembers the old Hotel Chesapeake and Restaurant?   Share your memories with us below in the comments!Do you have a photo to share for an upcoming PHOTO FRIDAY?  Email us at photos@harfordhistory.org!

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Where was this located?

IT'S PHOTO FRIDAY! Today, we present to you a photo of the Hopkins House.

The original owner of the Hopkins House, John Thomas Chew Hopkins, was born in 1843 in Havre de Grace to Thomas Chew Hopkins and Priscilla Worthington. He had an illustrious career after graduating from St. John’s College in Annapolis and reading law with Stevenson Archer in Bel Air. He was admitted to the Bar in 1865. He went on to become a member of the State Legislature, States Attorney for Harford County, and Deputy Collector of the Port of Baltimore.

Hopkins met and fell in love with a South Carolina debutante. Wanting to impress his new bride, he bought the lot that now holds the Hopkins House and moved the small Victorian house that once stood there to Broadway. Then in 1879, he hired Jacob Bull, a well-known local builder to construct the existing house - complete with the two story bay windows, plaster medallions, and marble mantles that marked the home of wealthy men of his day. Hopkins career continued to blossom and he went on to found and act as president of the Second National Bank on Office Street in Bel Air.

Do you have a photo to share for a future PHOTO FRIDAY? Please send your photos to photos@harfrodhistory.org!
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ITS PHOTO FRIDAY!  Today, we present to you a photo of the Hopkins House.The original owner of the Hopkins House, John Thomas Chew Hopkins, was born in 1843 in Havre de Grace to Thomas Chew Hopkins and Priscilla Worthington.  He had an illustrious career after graduating from St. John’s College in Annapolis and reading law with Stevenson Archer in Bel Air.  He was admitted to the Bar in 1865.  He went on to become a member of the State Legislature, States Attorney for Harford County, and Deputy Collector of the Port of Baltimore.Hopkins met and fell in love with a South Carolina debutante.  Wanting to impress his new bride, he bought the lot that now holds the Hopkins House and moved the small Victorian house that once stood there to Broadway. Then in 1879, he hired Jacob Bull, a well-known local builder to construct the existing house - complete with the two story bay windows, plaster medallions, and marble mantles that marked the home of wealthy men of his day. Hopkins career continued to blossom and he went on to found and act as president of the Second National Bank on Office Street in Bel Air.Do you have a photo to share for a future PHOTO FRIDAY?  Please send your photos to photos@harfrodhistory.org!

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As a child I went to a dentist in the old Masonic building. His name was Byrd Hopkins I think.

Jacob Bensen, County Preservation Planner, say the House where Bull fell to his death has as yet not been identified with assurance. 🤔

Is the house Jacob Bull died in still standing?

Love the house but truth is it's not being properly maintained. Flaking paint all over invites moisture and it wouldn't surprise me if it's not dry rot already.

I’m wondering if he’s related to Eddie Hopkins I’m sure he is.

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A message from the President - mailchi.mp/harfordhistory/message-from-the-president-4799326 ... See MoreSee Less

Divided Union - A Military History of Harford County in the Civil War - https://mailchi.mp/harfordhistory/divided-union-a-military-history-of-harford-county-in-the-civil-war-4797106

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brig, gen Issaac Trimble of pickets charge, lived on Trimble orad in edgewood.

Photographs are starting to arrive and each one has a unique story to tell. To make it easier for you to post your photographs, please email them to photos@harfordhistory.org and include a brief description of the photo so we can share with our followers. We hope to add new photos each Friday.

Today’s picture is from the Historical Society’s collection and captures the Kelly orchard that once stood where the Howard Park subdivision is situated today.
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Photographs are starting to arrive and each one has a unique story to tell.  To make it easier for you to post your photographs, please email them to photos@harfordhistory.org and include a brief description of the photo so we can share with our followers.  We hope to add new photos each Friday.Today’s picture is from the Historical Society’s collection and captures the Kelly orchard that once stood where the Howard Park subdivision is situated today.

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Who was the Dennis family? Thanks for posting.

Even after the passage of so many years, Fritz Kelly and John O’Neill are still very identifiable.

Divided Union - A Military History of Harford County in the Civil War - https://mailchi.mp/harfordhistory/divided-union-a-military-history-of-harford-county-in-the-civil-war

This photo was posted by Helen Smith Braun.
This picture was taken in Havre de Grace, Maryland. Third grade class, 1949. I think this School was at the end of Wilson Street. Wilson Street and Bloomsbury. Does anybody remember this?
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This photo was posted by Helen Smith Braun.
This picture was taken in Havre de Grace, Maryland. Third grade class, 1949. I think this School was at the end of Wilson Street. Wilson Street and Bloomsbury. Does anybody remember this?

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Does anyone know who the teacher is? Or any of the students?

They think they have large classes now!!

INTRODUCING PHOTO FRIDAYS

In May, the Society’s Facebook followers enjoyed our "This Place Matters" photographs so much that we decided to continue the program, but just a little differently. We are inviting members to share their photos of Harford County’s historic places, people and events with us. Each month we will introduce a new topic and invite you to share your historic photos with us on our Facebook page each Friday.

Harford County has a fascinating horse racing history with two major race tracks and many equine breeders, trainers and related industries. Now, the tracks are just a memory but the many legends live on. We encourage you to share photos of the race tracks, the horses and the people who were behind this legendary part of the county’s history.

To start the September Photo Friday project, here are two photographs taken at the Bel Air Race Track showing the grandstand and a parade. We are not sure of the date or the actual event, but encourage you to share your memories of this and other race track events throughout the county, along with photos of some of the famous horses, their owners, trainers and for added fun consider including some of the racing stories from these bygone days.
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INTRODUCING PHOTO FRIDAYSIn May, the Society’s Facebook followers enjoyed our This Place Matters photographs so much that we decided to continue the program, but just a little differently.  We are inviting members to share their photos of Harford County’s historic places, people and events with us.  Each month we will introduce a new topic and invite you to share your historic  photos with us on our Facebook page each Friday.Harford County has a fascinating horse racing history with two major race tracks and many equine breeders, trainers and related industries. Now, the tracks are just a memory but the many legends live on. We encourage you to share photos of the race tracks, the horses and the people who were behind this legendary part of the county’s history.To start the September Photo Friday project, here are two photographs taken at the Bel Air Race Track showing the grandstand and a parade. We are not sure of the date or the actual event, but encourage you to share your memories of this and other race track events throughout the county, along with photos of some of the  famous horses, their owners, trainers and for added fun consider including some of the racing stories from these bygone days.

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I believe that this track was were Harford Mall is now.

My grandmother raced a many horses there. I have some pictures of them. Every year we where at the track.

Would have made a great place for dirt track racing.

I remember marching around the race track when I was in band .

I still remember the stands and the Oak tree sitting in the infield of the track.

Where is Orange Bowl? 😛

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